Graphic1When you reach my age, you think about legacy quite often. A legacy is a gift that you leave to someone; something valuable that will remind people of you. Usually, people think about legacy in terms of financial or material gifts: cash, a painting, a house, etc. However, one’s legacy could also be a medical discovery, a scientific contribution, or one’s faith.

So, is what I have been doing creating the kind of legacy I want? Have I accomplished enough or done something important for people to remember me by? What else do I need to do to ensure a lasting legacy?

Have you ever asked these questions? Well, the longer I think about it, the more convinced I am that creating a legacy is not all about what we do. Building a very profitable a business empire, planting a mega-church, or winning the most number of golf tournaments–these are all great accomplishments. Legacies, if you please. However, I think the better question is about how these legacies were built.

The apostle Paul is regarded as a missionary par excellence. He had accomplished so much more in spreading the gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ than I could ever achieve in five lifetimes. However, Paul never gloried in his accomplishments. His legacy was something better. He said:

The only letter of recommendation we need is you yourselves. Your lives are a letter written in our hearts; everyone can read it and recognize our good work among you. (2 Corinthians 3:2 NLT)

I get it. It’s all about people, not things. I realize that our legacy is the people we work with, not the things we do or build.

What a powerful reminder as I start a new year.

<Note: Advertisements that may appear below are not mine.>

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s